GUNNAR NORDSTROM GALLERY
GUNNAR NORDSTROM GALLERY home gallery info artists exhibitions gallery news glossary GUNNAR NORDSTROM GALLERY
space
Thom Ross
Artist: Thom Ross, Title: Charge at Beecher Island - click for larger image
Charge at Beecher Island
48 x 60 Inches  Acrylic on Canvas   Sold
artist page
previous   next

Return to Thom Ross's Best of the West exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Art + Wine: A fundraiser for the KPC exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Thomassi-Rossi and Wattier-Nykreim exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Thom Ross exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's I Wanna be a Cowboy exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Thom Ross at the Little Bighorn exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's "Cowboys and Indians" exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's 21st Anniversary Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Tie my Fly exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Thom Ross - New Paintings exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's A Review of Past Works - See What You've Missed exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's A Review of Past Works - See what you've missed exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's 20th Anniversary Group Show exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's August Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Annual Holiday Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Thom Ross - New Paintings exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Summer Sizzle exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Indians on the Beach exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Holiday Exhibit and Grand Re-Opening exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Thom Ross exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Holiday Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - February exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Thom Ross exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - June exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - August exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - September exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - October exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - November exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - January exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Extended Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - August exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - September exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - October exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - November exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - January exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - April exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Holiday Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - March exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - June exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - August exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - September exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Holiday Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - January exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Western Exposure exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - August exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - September exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - November exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's February Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - February exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Revisited exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - May exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - July exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - October exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - November exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - February exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - March exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's "Western Exposure" exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit - October exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's March exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's April Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Go Figure exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Reflections exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's My Last Coversation with Albert Ball exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's New Works exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's May Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's June Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Draw Cowboy! exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Thom Ross exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Group Exhibit exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Never too late! exhibition page
Return to Thom Ross's Moby-Dick exhibition page
Contact us to inquire about this work.
The Battle of Beecher Island Major George A. Forsyth and 50 frontiersmen who had been recruited to help pursue depredating Cheyenne marched up the Arikaree fork of the Republican River, Colorado, in September, 1868. On the morning of September 17, they were attacked by Sioux and Cheyenne and took refuge on a small sandbar island which was later named Beecher Island after 1st Lieutenant Frederick H. Beecher, a victim of the fight. Three massed Indian charges were broken by the rapid fire of the scout's seven-shot Spencer carbines. The most famous Indian fatality of this fight was Roman Nose, the greatest warrior amongst the Southern Cheyenne. After his death, the intensity of the charges lessened as the Indians slowly dispersed across the prairie. But the besieged frontiersmen were still in danger. Surrounded by over 600 warriors, all their horses and 5 men dead, and many wounded, they faced not only the warriors but starvation. Two men, Jack Stilwell and Pierre Trudeau managed to pass thru the Indian's lines and go for help. On September 25 black troopers from the 10th Cavalry came to their aid. Forsyth himself had been shot three times and, when found, was calmly reading "Oliver Twist." Today the "island" is gone. There is a monument which celebrates the fight and one can walk a mile long trail and stand on top of the ridge from where the Indians could view the besieged soldiers. The canyon where the Indians massed their forces before each charge is still there and, from this ridge top, you can imagine them mounting their ponies and, whooping and yelling, charging out of this canyon and right down the river! Any book that deals with the Indian Wars will mention this engagement. (See also: "The Battle of Beecher Island and the Indian War of 1867-1869" by John H. Monnett)
space